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Tourmaline Sunangel, Heliangelus exortis; hummingbird; Rio Blanco Natural Reserve is...

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Caption: Tourmaline Sunangel, Heliangelus exortis; hummingbird; Rio Blanco Natural Reserve is one of the most famous places in Colombia to view birds; consist mainly of montane wet forest or cloud forest; Range Colombia and Ecuador; Colombia, South America; SunangelT56675_Ps2.jpg
Location: Rio Blanco Natural Reserve
Copyright: © Ann & Rob Simpson
Agent: www.agpix.com/snphotos
Release Available: Fees for one time use unless negotiated otherwise Ann and Rob Simpson
AGPix ID: AGPix_RoAnSi18_2314
Photo Alignment: 35mm (horizontal)
Comments: Ann & Rob Simpson - Simpson's Nature Photography, 1932 E Refuge Church Rd., Stephens City, VA 22655 Ph & Fax 540 869 2051 - AnnRobSimpson@snphotos.com - www.agpix.com/snphotos

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Ann & Rob Simpson
1932 E Refuge Church Rd.
Stephens City VA 22655-9607

Phone:
540 869-2051

Fax:
540 869-2051

Email:
annrobsimpson@snphotos.com

Website:
www.snphotos.com

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Ann & Rob Simpson

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Galápagos sea lion, Zalophus wollebaeki is a species of sea lion that exclusively breeds on the Galápagos Islands and - in smaller numbers - on Isla de la Plata (Ecuador). Being fairly social, and one of the most numerous species in the Galápagos archipelago, they are often spotted sun-bathing on sandy shores or rock groups or gliding gracefully through the surf. Their loud bark, playful nature, and graceful agility in water make them the "welcoming party" of the islands.They are the smallest fur sea lions. James Bay, Puerto Egas, Santiago Island, James Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, South America; SeaLionGA3673czs3.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
small ground finch, Geospiza fuliginosa is a species of bird in the tanager family Thraupidae. Endemic to the Galápagos Islands, it is common and widespread in shrubland, woodland, and other habitats on most islands in the archipelago. It commonly feeds on small seeds and parasites from the skins of Galápagos tortoises, and Galápagos land and marine iguanas. The small ground finch is one of Darwin's finches, a group of closely related birds which evolved on the Galápagos Islands. The group is related to the Tiaris grassquits, which are found in South America and the Caribbean.[2] When Charles Darwin first collected the species in 1835, he thought it was a finch. John Gould, who officially described Darwin's specimens, agreed, placing it in the genus Fringilla with the Old World finches. By 1841, Gould had changed his mind, moving this and five other species into the new genus Geospiza -- still a genus of finches, but distinct from those of the Old World. DNA research has now shown that all Darwin's "finches" are actually tanagers. James Bay, Puerto Egas, Santiago Island, James Island, Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, South America; FinchSG3973zxs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson