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Silver-leaved Frailejones , Bello Grigio Espeletia, Senecio niveoaureus, also known...

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Caption: Silver-leaved Frailejones , Bello Grigio Espeletia, Senecio niveoaureus, also known as white arnica; Andes endemic paramo plant with large toilet paper white fuzzy leaves and yellow sunflower like flowers. The species, known as white arnica, comes from the páramo of Colombia and Ecuador, a high-altitude tundra zone found at about 10,000 to 15,000 feet (3100 to 4600 m) of altitude in the Andes, a climate where it is cold at night all year long and rarely more than chilly during the day. If the plant is completely covered with white hairs, that's partly to protect it from the cold, but also to filter out excess sunlight, because it usually grows above the clouds, fully exposed to harmful UV rays. Senecio with more than 1200 species, is one of the largest genera of flowering plants in the world. Los Nevados National Park, Nevado del Ruiz, paramo, central Andes, high altitude paramo, Termales del Ruiz, Colombia, South America; FrailejonesSL11148_P.jpg
Location: Los Nevados National Park, Nevado del Ruiz, central Andes
Copyright: © Ann & Rob Simpson
Agent: www.agpix.com/snphotos
Release Available: © Fees for one time use unless negotiated otherwise © Ann and Rob Simpson
AGPix ID: AGPix_RoAnSi18_2282
Photo Alignment: 35mm (horizontal)
Comments: © Ann & Rob Simpson - Simpson's Nature Photography, 1932 E Refuge Church Rd., Stephens City, VA 22655 Ph & Fax 540 869 2051 - AnnRobSimpson@snphotos.com - www.agpix.com/snphotos

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Ann & Rob Simpson
1932 E Refuge Church Rd.
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The Rama VIII Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge crossing the Chao Phraya River in Bangkok, Thailand. It was built to alleviate traffic congestion on the nearby Phra Pinklao Bridge. Construction of the bridge took place from 1999 to 2002. The bridge was opened on 7 May 2002 and inaugurated on 20 September, the birth anniversary of the late King Ananda Mahidol (Rama VIII), after whom it is named. The bridge has an asymmetrical design, with a single pylon in an inverted Y shape on the west bank of the river. Its eighty-four cables are arranged in pairs on the side of the main span and in a single row on the other. The bridge has a main span of 300 metres (980 ft), and was one of the world's largest asymmetrical cable-stayed bridges at the time of its completion. Bangkok, night on the river Chao Phraya River delta, Bangkok  is the capital and most populous city of the Kingdom of Thailand. It is known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon or simply Krung Thep. The city occupies 1,568.7 square kilometres (605.7 sq mi) in the Chao Phraya River delta in Central Thailand, and has a population of over 8 million, or 12.6 percent of the country's population. Over 14 million people (22.2 percent) lived within the surrounding Bangkok Metropolitan Region at the 2010 census, making Bangkok an extreme primate city, significantly dwarfing Thailand's other urban centres in terms of importance. Limited roads, despite an extensive expressway network, together with substantial private car usage, have led to chronic and crippling traffic congestion, which caused severe air pollution in the 1990s. The city has since turned to public transport in an attempt to solve this major problem. Thailand, Asia; Pacific Rim; THAI026918.CR2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Bangkok, night on the river Chao Phraya River delta, Bangkok  is the capital and most populous city of the Kingdom of Thailand. It is known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon or simply Krung Thep. The city occupies 1,568.7 square kilometres (605.7 sq mi) in the Chao Phraya River delta in Central Thailand, and has a population of over 8 million, or 12.6 percent of the country's population. Over 14 million people (22.2 percent) lived within the surrounding Bangkok Metropolitan Region at the 2010 census, making Bangkok an extreme primate city, significantly dwarfing Thailand's other urban centres in terms of importance. Limited roads, despite an extensive expressway network, together with substantial private car usage, have led to chronic and crippling traffic congestion, which caused severe air pollution in the 1990s. The city has since turned to public transport in an attempt to solve this major problem. Thailand, Asia; Pacific Rim; THAI026861.CR2
© Ann & Rob Simpson