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from photographer Ann & Rob Simpson


Los Nevados National Park, Nevado del Ruiz, paramo, central Andes,...

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Caption: Los Nevados National Park, Nevado del Ruiz, paramo, central Andes, high altitude paramo, Termales del Ruiz, Colombia, South America; COLU111099_P.jpg
Location: Los Nevados National Park, Nevado del Ruiz, central Andes
Copyright: © Ann & Rob Simpson
Agent: www.agpix.com/snphotos
Release Available: Fees for one time use unless negotiated otherwise Ann and Rob Simpson
AGPix ID: AGPix_RoAnSi18_2271
Photo Alignment: 35mm (horizontal)
Comments: Ann & Rob Simpson - Simpson's Nature Photography, 1932 E Refuge Church Rd., Stephens City, VA 22655 Ph & Fax 540 869 2051 - AnnRobSimpson@snphotos.com - www.agpix.com/snphotos

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Ann & Rob Simpson
1932 E Refuge Church Rd.
Stephens City VA 22655-9607

Phone:
540 869-2051

Fax:
540 869-2051

Email:
annrobsimpson@snphotos.com

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www.snphotos.com

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Ann & Rob Simpson

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Maasai giving a tourist presentation of their traditional lifestyle. The Maasai or Masai are a Nilotic ethnic group inhabiting northern, central and southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. They are among the best known local populations internationally due to their residence near the many game parks of the African Great Lakes, and their distinctive customs and dress. The Maasai speak the Maa language (?l Maa), a member of the Nilo-Saharan family that is related to the Dinka, Kalenjin and Nuer languages.Tanzania, is in East Africa,  It is thought that the Maasai's ancestors originated in North Africa, migrating south along the Nile Valley and arriving in Northern Kenya in the middle of the 15th century. They continued southward, conquering all of the tribes in their path, extending through the Rift Valley and arriving in Tanzania at the end of 19th century. As they migrated, they attacked their neighbors and raided cattle. By the end of their journey, the Maasai had taken over almost all of the land in the Rift Valley as well as the adjacent land from Mount Marsabit to Dodoma, where they settled to graze their cattle. The Maasai tribe has a deep, almost sacred, relationship with cattle. They are guided by a strong belief that God created cattle especially for them and that they are the sole custodians of all the cattle on earth. This bond has led them into a nomadic way of life following patterns of rainfall over vast land in search of food and water for their large herds of cattle. Maasai dress consists of red sheets, (shuka), wrapped around the body and loads of beaded jewelry placed around the neck and arms. These are worn by both men and women and may vary in color depending on the occasion. Ear piercing and the stretching of earlobes are also part of Maasai beauty, and both men and women wear metal hoops on their stretched earlobes. Women shave their heads and remove two middle teeth on the lower jaw (for oral delivery of traditional medicine). The Maasai often walk barefooted or wear simple sandals made of cow hide.Africa, Masai82335_P.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Maasai, the Maasai or Masai are a Nilotic ethnic group inhabiting northern, central and southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. The warrior called a morani, is of great importance as a source of pride in the Maasai culture. To be a Maasai is to be born into one of the world's last great warrior cultures. From boyhood to adulthood, young Maasai boys begin to learn the responsibilities of being a man (helder) and a warrior. The role of a warrior is to protect their animals from human and animal predators, to build kraals (Maasai homes) and to provide security to their families. Through rituals and ceremonies, including circumcision, Maasai boys are guided and mentored by their fathers and other elders on how to become a warrior. Although they still live their carefree lives as boys - raiding cattle, chasing young girls, and game hunting - a Maasai boy must also learn all of the cultural practices, customary laws and responsibilities he'll require as an elder. An elaborate ceremony - Eunoto - is usually performed to "graduate" the young man from their moran and carefree lifestyle to that of a warrior. Beginning life as a warrior means a young man can now settle down and start a family, acquire cattle and become a responsible elder. In his late years, the middle-aged warrior will be elevated to a senior and more responsible elder during the Olng'eshere ceremony. They are among the best known local populations internationally due to their residence near the many game parks of the African Great Lakes, and their distinctive customs and dress. The Maasai speak the Maa language (?l Maa), a member of the Nilo-Saharan family that is related to the Dinka, Kalenjin and Nuer languages.Tanzania, is in East Africa,  It is thought that the Maasai's ancestors originated in North Africa, migrating south along the Nile Valley and arriving in Northern Kenya in the middle of the 15th century. They continued southward, conquering all of the tribes in their path, extending through the Rift Valley and arriving in Tanzania at the end of 19th century. As they migrated, they attacked their neighbors and raided cattle. By the end of their journey, the Maasai had taken over almost all of the land in the Rift Valley as well as the adjacent land from Mount Marsabit to Dodoma, where they settled to graze their cattle. The Maasai tribe has a deep, almost sacred, relationship with cattle. They are guided by a strong belief that God created cattle especially for them and that they are the sole custodians of all the cattle on earth. This bond has led them into a nomadic way of life following patterns of rainfall over vast land in search of food and water for their large herds of cattle. Maasai dress consists of red sheets, (shuka), wrapped around the body and loads of beaded jewelry placed around the neck and arms. These are worn by both men and women and may vary in color depending on the occasion. Ear piercing and the stretching of earlobes are also part of Maasai beauty, and both men and women wear metal hoops on their stretched earlobes. Women shave their heads and remove two middle teeth on the lower jaw (for oral delivery of traditional medicine). The Maasai often walk barefooted or wear simple sandals made of cow hide.Africa, Maasai83187_P.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson