Ann & Rob Simpson
http://www.agpix.com/snphotos

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white-necked jacobin, Florisuga mellivora;  feeding nectaring on Expanded Lobsterclaw, Heliconia latispatha, hummingbird, Trochilidae; Rancho Naturalista, mid elevation montane Caribbean Rainforest, 3000 feet elevation,Heliconia latispatha, Expanded Lobsterclaw [2] is a plant species native to southern Mexico (Tabasco, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Campeche), Central America and northern South America (Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Peru) and naturalized in Florida and Jamaica. Costa Rica, Central America, CR3A4970czs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
white-necked jacobin,
Florisuga mellivora;
feeding...

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Large-flowered (White) Trillium, Trillium grandiflorum,  large white trillium, Trillium grandiflorum var. roseum, {large-flowered trillium, turns pink with age but these opened out pink;  VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park,  hike to Hightop on Appalachian Trail, TrilliumLF2540.CR2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Large-flowered (White)
Trillium, Trillium
grandiflorum,...

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VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park, Tuliptree, Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Poplar, Tuliptree Forest mm 8 at Low Gap, gap species that rapidly dominates a disturbed site, autumn fall; Tuliptree4034724.cr2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
VA, Virginia, Shenandoah
National Park,...

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trailing arbutus, Epigaea repens, Appalachian Trail, ground laurel, mayflower, mountain pink, may flower, gravel plant, winter pink, Saw Mill Run Overlook, ephemeral spring wildflower, spring wildflower; march, early spring, Dry forest Chestnut Oak, Chestnut, Table Mountain Pine habitat with rare plant and animal species; Scarlet Oak, Quercus coccinea, woody plant, secondary growth, bark Shenandoah National Park, Virginia; VA,  Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, SHEN013612.CR2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
trailing arbutus, Epigaea
repens, Appalachian...


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Patagonian Scarlet Gorse, Anarthrophyllum desideratum, also known as Guanaco Bush or Fire Tongue, Called Mata Guanaco,(Guanaco Bush, Lengua de Fuego, Fire Tongue or Neneo Macho in Chile; Torres del Paine National Park Spanish: Parque Nacional Torres del Paine is a national park encompassing mountains, glaciers, lakes, and rivers in southern Chilean Patagonia. The Cordillera del Paine is the centerpiece of the park. It lies in a transition area between the Magellanic subpolar forests and the Patagonian Steppes. Torres del Paine National Park is part of the Sistema Nacional de Áreas Silvestres Protegidas del Estado de Chile (National System of Protected Forested Areas of Chile). In 2006, it measured approximately 242,242 hectares. It is one of the largest and most visited parks in Chile. The Torres del Paine are the distinctive three granite peaks of the Paine mountain range or Paine Massif. They extend 2,850 meters above sea level, and are joined by the Cuernos del Paine. The area also boasts valleys, rivers such as the Paine, lakes, and glaciers. The well-known lakes include Grey, Pehoé, Nordenskiöld, and Sarmiento. The glaciers, including Grey, Pingo and Tyndall, belong to the Southern Patagonia Ice Field. The park averages around 150,000 visitors a year, of which 60% are foreign tourists, Chile, Patagonia, South America, Patagonia9302rzs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Patagonian Scarlet Gorse,
Anarthrophyllum
desideratum,...

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Large-leaved lupine in Torres del Paine National Park; Large-leaved lupine, Lupinus polyphyllus, big-leaved lupine, many-leaved lupine and this showy species is often called  garden lupin or lupine as it is widely used in cultivation. It is native to western North America from southern Alaska and British Columbia east to Quebec, and western Wyoming, and south to Utah and California. It commonly grows along streams and creeks, preferring moist habitats. It has escaped from gardens and is introduced and or invasive in eastern North America, much of Europe, New Zealand and parts of South America all the way to Patagonia, Chile. The leaves are palmately compound. The flowers are produced on a tall spike, most commonly blue to purple in wild plants. The flowers are mostly visited by bumblebees. The Lupinus polyphyllus polyphyllus variety in particular make up a great number of the hybrids which are generally grown as garden lupines, they can vary dramatically in colours.  Davis and Stout (1986) measured quantities of anagyrine that exceeded the minimum necessary to cause crooked calf disease (teratogenic deformities) in calves. Most Lupinus have toxic alkaloids in their legumes, seeds.  Parque Nacional Torres del Paine; is a national park encompassing mountains, glaciers, lakes, and rivers in southern Chilean Patagonia. The Cordillera del Paine is the centerpiece of the park. It lies in a transition area between the Magellanic subpolar forests and the Patagonian Steppes. Torres del Paine National Park is part of the Sistema Nacional de Áreas Silvestres Protegidas del Estado de Chile (National System of Protected Forested Areas of Chile). In 2006, it measured approximately 242,242 hectares. It is one of the largest and most visited parks in Chile. The Torres del Paine are the distinctive three granite peaks of the Paine mountain range or Paine Massif. They extend 2,850 meters above sea level, and are joined by the Cuernos del Paine. The area also boasts valleys, rivers such as the Paine, lakes, and glaciers. The well-known lakes include Grey, Pehoé, Nordenskiöld, and Sarmiento. The glaciers, including Grey, Pingo and Tyndall, belong to the Southern Patagonia Ice Field. The park averages around 150,000 visitors a year, of which 60% are foreign tourists, In contrast, South American Lupine, Lupinus mutabilis, is a species of lupin grown in the Andes, mainly for its edible bean. Vernacular names include tarwi, tarhui, chocho, altramuz, Andean lupin, South American lupin, Peruvian field lupin, or pearl lupin. There are different aspects why L. mutabilis could become an important international crop. But until now, the high content of alkaloids in the seed is the main reason why the crop is not very known outside the Andes. This content could be decreased by different processes. Spanish: lupine, Lupinus sp: Seeds of this genus of flowering plants from the legume family have been used as a food source in the Andean Highlands for over 6000 years. Lupinus mutabilis,  known as tarwi or chocho, was extensively cultivated by the Incas. Users would soak the seeds in running water to remove bitter alkaloids, and then either cooked them to make them edible or boiled and dried them. They're coming back into fashion as an alternative to soybeans. Chile, Patagonia, South America, PAT2C3333czsntvUSE.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Large-leaved lupine in Torres
del...

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Saint Mary, Saint Mary Ranger Station Road, Glacier National Park, Montana; Northern Sweetvetch, Hedysarum boreale, Apiaceae {Boreal Sweetvetch}, United States, US, USA;    wildflower, angiosperm {wildflowers, wild flower, angiosperms}; Glacier1008042z_AnnRobSimpson.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Saint Mary, Saint Mary
Ranger...

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VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park, Tuliptree, Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Poplar, Tuliptree Forest mm 8 at Low Gap, gap species that rapidly dominates a disturbed site, autumn fall; Tuliptree000801.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
VA, Virginia, Shenandoah
National Park,...


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VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park, Tuliptree, Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Poplar, Tuliptree Forest mm 8 at Low Gap, gap species that rapidly dominates a disturbed site, autumn fall; Tuliptree50294_14959.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
VA, Virginia, Shenandoah
National Park,...

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VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park, Tuliptree, Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Poplar, Tuliptree Forest mm 8 at Low Gap, gap species that rapidly dominates a disturbed site, autumn fall; Tuliptree1040716.cr2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
VA, Virginia, Shenandoah
National Park,...

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VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park, Tuliptree, Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Poplar, Tuliptree Forest mm 8 at Low Gap, gap species that rapidly dominates a disturbed site, autumn fall; Tuliptree2034316.cr2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
VA, Virginia, Shenandoah
National Park,...

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VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park, Tuliptree, Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Poplar, Tuliptree Forest mm 8 at Low Gap, gap species that rapidly dominates a disturbed site, autumn fall; Tuliptree2034016.cr2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
VA, Virginia, Shenandoah
National Park,...


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VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park, Tuliptree, Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Poplar, Tuliptree Forest mm 8 at Low Gap, gap species that rapidly dominates a disturbed site, autumn fall; Tuliptree4035856.cr2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
VA, Virginia, Shenandoah
National Park,...

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VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park, Tuliptree, Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Poplar, Tuliptree Forest mm 8 at Low Gap, gap species that rapidly dominates a disturbed site, autumn fall; Tuliptree5040648.cr2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
VA, Virginia, Shenandoah
National Park,...

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VA, Virginia, Shenandoah National Park, Tuliptree, Liriodendron tulipifera, Tulip Poplar, Tuliptree Forest mm 8 at Low Gap, gap species that rapidly dominates a disturbed site, autumn fall; Tuliptree7040528.cr2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
VA, Virginia, Shenandoah
National Park,...

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Witch Hazel, Hamamelis virginiana, American witch hazel, American witchhazel, Witch-hazel, unique, fragrant, yellow flowers, aromatic, aromatic extract, astringent, astringent tannins, anti-inflammatory properties, styptic, herbal remedy, soothing, tea, dowsing rod, Shenandoah National Park in fall season with colorful autumn leaves, Virginia, USA, Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains WitchHazel3B4543_AnnRobSimpson.cr2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Witch Hazel, Hamamelis
virginiana, American...


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Witch Hazel, Hamamelis virginiana, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains; fall autumn leaf color
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Witch Hazel, Hamamelis
virginiana, Shenandoah...

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Witch Hazel, Hamamelis virginiana, American witch hazel, American witchhazel, Witch-hazel, unique, fragrant, yellow flowers, aromatic, aromatic extract, astringent, astringent tannins, anti-inflammatory properties, styptic, herbal remedy, soothing, tea, dowsing rod, Shenandoah National Park in fall season with colorful autumn leaves, Virginia, USA, Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains WithHazel0563AnnRobSimpson.cr2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Witch Hazel, Hamamelis
virginiana, American...

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Woodland Sunflower, Helianthus divaricatus, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, plants; flower, flowering, bloom, blooming, anthesis; wildflower, angiosperm, wildflowers, wild flower, angiosperms, Shenandoah_FAC744943641.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Woodland Sunflower, Helianthus
divaricatus, Shenandoah...

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Woodland Sunflower, Helianthus divaricatus, rough sunflower, Loft Mountain, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, North America; United States of America {America, U.S., United States, US, USA}; VA,  plants; flower; wildflower; sunflower {Helianthus sp.}; bird attractant, very common sunflower in partly shady places, flowers from Summer to Fall, seasons, Summer, summertime, August, 178811_023329
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Woodland Sunflower, Helianthus
divaricatus, rough...


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spotted beebalm, horsemint, Monarda punctata is a herbaceous plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae, that is native to eastern Canada, the eastern United States and northeastern Mexico. It is a thyme-scented plant The plant contains thymol, an antiseptic and fungicide. [2] It was historically used to treat upset stomachs, colds, diarrhea, neuralgia and kidney disease. Meadows managed for butterfly larval and pollinator plants as well as hummingbird flowers. In the fall and winter the meadows provide cover and food for a wide variety of bird, mammal and insect species, including sparrows, finches, titmice, chickadees, deer, foxes, voles, bees, bumble-bees, butterflies including monarchs ... Sky Meadows State Park, Virginia, USA; MonardaP13337V20.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
spotted beebalm, horsemint,
Monarda punctata...

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spotted beebalm, horsemint, Monarda punctata is a herbaceous plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae, that is native to eastern Canada, the eastern United States and northeastern Mexico. It is a thyme-scented plant The plant contains thymol, an antiseptic and fungicide. [2] It was historically used to treat upset stomachs, colds, diarrhea, neuralgia and kidney disease. Meadows managed for butterfly larval and pollinator plants as well as hummingbird flowers. In the fall and winter the meadows provide cover and food for a wide variety of bird, mammal and insect species, including sparrows, finches, titmice, chickadees, deer, foxes, voles, bees, bumble-bees, butterflies including monarchs ... Sky Meadows State Park, Virginia, USA; MonardaP13367V20.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
spotted beebalm, horsemint,
Monarda punctata...

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spotted beebalm, horsemint, Monarda punctata is a herbaceous plant in the mint family, Lamiaceae, that is native to eastern Canada, the eastern United States and northeastern Mexico. It is a thyme-scented plant The plant contains thymol, an antiseptic and fungicide. [2] It was historically used to treat upset stomachs, colds, diarrhea, neuralgia and kidney disease. Meadows managed for butterfly larval and pollinator plants as well as hummingbird flowers. In the fall and winter the meadows provide cover and food for a wide variety of bird, mammal and insect species, including sparrows, finches, titmice, chickadees, deer, foxes, voles, bees, bumble-bees, butterflies including monarchs ... Sky Meadows State Park, Virginia, USA; MonardaP13388V20.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
spotted beebalm, horsemint,
Monarda punctata...

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white-necked jacobin, Florisuga mellivora;  feeding nectaring on Expanded Lobsterclaw, Heliconia latispatha, hummingbird, Trochilidae; Rancho Naturalista, mid elevation montane Caribbean Rainforest, 3000 feet elevation,Heliconia latispatha, Expanded Lobsterclaw [2] is a plant species native to southern Mexico (Tabasco, Oaxaca, Chiapas, Campeche), Central America and northern South America (Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Peru) and naturalized in Florida and Jamaica. Costa Rica, Central America, JacobinWn4942zh1s.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
white-necked jacobin,
Florisuga mellivora;
feeding...


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Large Fruit-eating Bat, Artibeus jamaicensis; Jamaican Friut-eating Bat, as the bat feeds on the nectar it is covered in the yellow flower pollen and thus acts as an inadvertent but very effective pollinator of the plant as it transfers the male pollen to a receptive female stimga when visiting another flower; AMERICAN LEAF-NOSED BATS, in the Family Phyllostomidae, TAILLESS BATS, in the Subfamily Stenodermatinae; bat, Chiroptera; Riviera Maya; Sandos Caracol Eco Resort, Mexico, Central America; Yucatán Peninsula, BatJFe2879cxUSEt1.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Large Fruit-eating Bat,
Artibeus jamaicensis;...

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Large Fruit-eating Bat, Artibeus jamaicensis; Jamaican Friut-eating Bat, as the bat feeds on the nectar it is covered in the yellow flower pollen and thus acts as an inadvertent but very effective pollinator of the plant as it transfers the male pollen to a receptive female stimga when visiting another flower; AMERICAN LEAF-NOSED BATS, in the Family Phyllostomidae, TAILLESS BATS, in the Subfamily Stenodermatinae; bat, Chiroptera; Riviera Maya; Sandos Caracol Eco Resort, Mexico, Central America; Yucatán Peninsula, BatJFe3174Ls.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Large Fruit-eating Bat,
Artibeus jamaicensis;...

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Archilochus colubris nectaring on  Bee Balm, Monarda didyma,= bergamot, beebalm, Oswego-tea;Trochilidae; RTHU, eastern North America's sole breeding hummingbirdBlue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina; HummingbirdRt1180.CR2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Ruby-throated Hummingbird,
Archilochus colubris
nectaring...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41094r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...


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Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Archilochus colubris,  Trochilidae, neotropical migrant; Shenandoah National Park, Virginia; North America; USA; Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, male, AHY, birds, bird; hummingbird,  ruby-throated hummingbird, RTHU, plants; flower; wildflower, angiosperm, wildflowers, wild flower, angiosperms; columbine, Ranunculaceae; Wild Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis, hummingbird pollinated, tubular flower, nectary, nectaries, HummingbirdRt013031cz2nx1sz_55_14wz_95.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Ruby-throated Hummingbird,
Archilochus colubris,
Trochilidae,...

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Purple corn is found mostly in Peru, has been cultivated for thousands of years.  cultivated from the coast to almost ten thousand feet high.  It has been extensively used as a staple food and a natural coloring purple dye.There are different genetic strains of purple corn, all of which originated from the line called "Kculli", which is still cultivated in Peru.  Objects in the shape of these particular ears of corn have been found in archeological sites at least 2,500 years old.   Maiz morado, a purple corn native to Peru, special for its delicate lemon-blossomy flavor. Purple corn (maiz morado) is a major Andean crop.  Andeans make a refreshing drink from purple corn called "chicha morada".  It is also one of nature's richest sources of at least six different anthocyanin antioxidants. Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41075r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Purple corn is found mostly...

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Qaqa Sunka, beard lichen, Usnea barbata, Dark blues dye, red, pink, orange, purpleChinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41098r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Qaqa Sunka, beard lichen,
Usnea...

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Archilochus colubris,  Trochilidae, neotropical migrant; Shenandoah National Park, Virginia; North America; USA; Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, male, AHY, birds, bird; hummingbird,  ruby-throated hummingbird, RTHU, plants; flower; wildflower, angiosperm, wildflowers, wild flower, angiosperms; columbine, Ranunculaceae; Wild Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis, hummingbird pollinated, tubular flower, nectary, nectaries, HummingbirdRt023096useg.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Ruby-throated Hummingbird,
Archilochus colubris,
Trochilidae,...


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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41033r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40946r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40940r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40896r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...


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scarlet passion flower, Passiflora coccinea, red passion flower, Passionflower, Passiflora sp. Ceiba Tops Lodge, Amazon River, The Amazon, Rio Amazonas, in South America is the largest river by discharge volume of water in the world and according to most authorities, the second longest in length - Wikipedia; Amazon River rainforest, Peru, South America, Passionflower48363.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
scarlet passion flower,
Passiflora coccinea,...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40862r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Giant Victoria Lily or Amazon Lily, Victoria amazonica is found in oxbow lakes and bayous of the Amazon River and its tributaries. It is the national flower of Guyana. The fragrant flowers are white the first night they are open and start out as female flowers. The second night they become pink and change into male flowers. They are pollinated by scarab beetles. The sexual alteration helps prevent self pollination. On their third day the pollinated flowers sink to the river bottom to develop into a seed pod and produce seeds and when mature float to disperse the seeds. Apparently the spines on the underside of the leaves are a defense mechanism against Amazon manatees. Ceiba Tops Lodge, Amazon River, The Amazon, Rio Amazonas, in South America is the largest river by discharge volume of water in the world and according to most authorities, the second longest in length - Wikipedia; Amazon River rainforest, Peru, South America, LilyGA149208u.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Giant Victoria Lily or
Amazon...

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Giant Victoria Lily or Amazon Lily, Victoria amazonica is found in oxbow lakes and bayous of the Amazon River and its tributaries. It is the national flower of Guyana. The fragrant flowers are white the first night they are open and start out as female flowers. The second night they become pink and change into male flowers. They are pollinated by scarab beetles. The sexual alteration helps prevent self pollination. On their third day the pollinated flowers sink to the river bottom to develop into a seed pod and produce seeds and when mature float to disperse the seeds. Apparently the spines on the underside of the leaves are a defense mechanism against Amazon manatees. Ceiba Tops Lodge, Amazon River, The Amazon, Rio Amazonas, in South America is the largest river by discharge volume of water in the world and according to most authorities, the second longest in length - Wikipedia; Amazon River rainforest, Peru, South America, LilyGA149205u.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Giant Victoria Lily or
Amazon...


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Giant Victoria Lily or Amazon Lily, Victoria amazonica is found in oxbow lakes and bayous of the Amazon River and its tributaries. It is the national flower of Guyana. The fragrant flowers are white the first night they are open and start out as female flowers. The second night they become pink and change into male flowers. They are pollinated by scarab beetles. The sexual alteration helps prevent self pollination. On their third day the pollinated flowers sink to the river bottom to develop into a seed pod and produce seeds and when mature float to disperse the seeds. Apparently the spines on the underside of the leaves are a defense mechanism against Amazon manatees. Ceiba Tops Lodge, Amazon River, The Amazon, Rio Amazonas, in South America is the largest river by discharge volume of water in the world and according to most authorities, the second longest in length - Wikipedia; Amazon River rainforest, Peru, South America, LilyGA149210u.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Giant Victoria Lily or
Amazon...

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Giant Victoria Lily or Amazon Lily, Victoria amazonica is found in oxbow lakes and bayous of the Amazon River and its tributaries. It is the national flower of Guyana. The fragrant flowers are white the first night they are open and start out as female flowers. The second night they become pink and change into male flowers. They are pollinated by scarab beetles. The sexual alteration helps prevent self pollination. On their third day the pollinated flowers sink to the river bottom to develop into a seed pod and produce seeds and when mature float to disperse the seeds. Apparently the spines on the underside of the leaves are a defense mechanism against Amazon manatees. Ceiba Tops Lodge, Amazon River, The Amazon, Rio Amazonas, in South America is the largest river by discharge volume of water in the world and according to most authorities, the second longest in length - Wikipedia; Amazon River rainforest, Peru, South America, LilyGA149210uv.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Giant Victoria Lily or
Amazon...

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Giant Victoria Lily or Amazon Lily, Victoria amazonica is found in oxbow lakes and bayous of the Amazon River and its tributaries. It is the national flower of Guyana. The fragrant flowers are white the first night they are open and start out as female flowers. The second night they become pink and change into male flowers. They are pollinated by scarab beetles. The sexual alteration helps prevent self pollination. On their third day the pollinated flowers sink to the river bottom to develop into a seed pod and produce seeds and when mature float to disperse the seeds. Apparently the spines on the underside of the leaves are a defense mechanism against Amazon manatees. Ceiba Tops Lodge, Amazon River, The Amazon, Rio Amazonas, in South America is the largest river by discharge volume of water in the world and according to most authorities, the second longest in length - Wikipedia; Amazon River rainforest, Peru, South America, LilyGA149216u.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Giant Victoria Lily or
Amazon...

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Giant Victoria Lily or Amazon Lily, Victoria amazonica is found in oxbow lakes and bayous of the Amazon River and its tributaries. It is the national flower of Guyana. The fragrant flowers are white the first night they are open and start out as female flowers. The second night they become pink and change into male flowers. They are pollinated by scarab beetles. The sexual alteration helps prevent self pollination. On their third day the pollinated flowers sink to the river bottom to develop into a seed pod and produce seeds and when mature float to disperse the seeds. Apparently the spines on the underside of the leaves are a defense mechanism against Amazon manatees. Ceiba Tops Lodge, Amazon River, The Amazon, Rio Amazonas, in South America is the largest river by discharge volume of water in the world and according to most authorities, the second longest in length - Wikipedia; Amazon River rainforest, Peru, South America, LilyGA149270u.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Giant Victoria Lily or
Amazon...


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Giant Victoria Lily or Amazon Lily, Victoria amazonica is found in oxbow lakes and bayous of the Amazon River and its tributaries. It is the national flower of Guyana. The fragrant flowers are white the first night they are open and start out as female flowers. The second night they become pink and change into male flowers. They are pollinated by scarab beetles. The sexual alteration helps prevent self pollination. On their third day the pollinated flowers sink to the river bottom to develop into a seed pod and produce seeds and when mature float to disperse the seeds. Apparently the spines on the underside of the leaves are a defense mechanism against Amazon manatees. Ceiba Tops Lodge, Amazon River, The Amazon, Rio Amazonas, in South America is the largest river by discharge volume of water in the world and according to most authorities, the second longest in length - Wikipedia; Amazon River rainforest, Peru, South America, LilyGA149270uv.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Giant Victoria Lily or
Amazon...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40879r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40887r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, rolling the ball of yarn back and forth in a special type of weaving;  unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40903r.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, rolling the
ball...


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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40931r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41007r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chilca, Baccharis latifolia , green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Family: Asteraceae; Chilean romerillo; Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41109r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chilca, Baccharis latifolia ,
green...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41121r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...


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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41123r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers,with tourist, bartering, toruism now a major income source, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41164.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers,with
tourist, bartering, toruism...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41190rzvc1.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Archilochus colubris,  Trochilidae, neotropical migrant; Shenandoah National Park, Virginia; North America; USA; Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains, male, AHY, birds, bird; hummingbird,  ruby-throated hummingbird, RTHU, plants; flower; wildflower, angiosperm, wildflowers, wild flower, angiosperms; columbine, Ranunculaceae; Wild Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis, hummingbird pollinated, tubular flower, nectary, nectaries, HummingbirdRt023109nz1nsaexL.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Ruby-throated Hummingbird,
Archilochus colubris,
Trochilidae,...


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