Ann & Rob Simpson
http://www.agpix.com/snphotos

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European hornet, Vespa crabro, a large species that is often mistaken for the Asian Giant Hornet; Mutual grooming;  They will nest in trees with a large number of individuals. I accidentally stepped on one of these with my bare foot and they do pack a powerful sting.  insect, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA; HornetE13437cdzsx1.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
European hornet, Vespa crabro,
a...

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Indo-Chinese Spot Swordtail, Graphium nomius swinhoei ; larval host Annonaceae, Miliusa tomentosa, Polyalthia cerasoides; a type of Swallowtail Papilionidae, Thailand, Asia; Pacific Rim; SwordtailICS15321Lnzhs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Indo-Chinese Spot Swordtail,
Graphium nomius...

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Redbacked Jumping Spider, Phidippus johnsoni; spider, Johnson Jumper, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA; RedbackJumpingSpider67219zSs.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Redbacked Jumping Spider,
Phidippus johnsoni;...

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Guava Skipper, Phocides palemon, National Butterfly Center, Located in Mission, Texas, near the Rio Grande River, and only 15 minutes from a major airport in McAllen A flagship project of the North American Butterfly Association, more than 300 species of butterflies may be found in the LRGV, and more than 200 species have been seen at the National Butterfly Center, including a number of rarities and U.S. Records! SkipperG9513cs1.tif   3333 Butterfly Park Drive, Mission, TX 78572,  956-583-5400Texas,
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Guava Skipper, Phocides
palemon, National...


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Blue Metalmark, Lasaia sula; National Butterfly Center, Located in Mission, Texas, near the Rio Grande River, and only 15 minutes from a major airport in McAllen A flagship project of the North American Butterfly Association, more than 300 species of butterflies may be found in the LRGV, and more than 200 species have been seen at the National Butterfly Center, including a number of rarities and U.S. Records! MetalmarkB6828cz3s_85.tif   3333 Butterfly Park Drive, Mission, TX 78572,  956-583-5400Texas,
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Blue Metalmark, Lasaia sula;
National...

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Turk's-cap Lily, Lilium superbum {Turk's cap Lily, Turkscap Lily, Turkscaplily, Swamp Lily, Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly, Battus philenor, wildflower, wet meadows and woods, gentle giant of summer, native perennial} Craggy Gardens, Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina; Flora-Lily-TurksCap62766Ls.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Turk's-cap Lily, Lilium
superbum {Turk's...

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wax-tail planthopper, wax-tail Fulgorid, Pterodictya reticularis, This and some other fulgorids exude waxy strands from the rear of the abdomen, the wax is secreted regularly and is eaten by certain species of small butterflies whose larvae live on the bodies of lantern flies. Fulgorid Planthopper, wax-tail hopper,  wax tail latern fly; Ceiba Tops Lodge, Amazon River, The Amazon, Rio Amazonas, in South America is the largest river by discharge volume of water in the world and according to most authorities, the second longest in length - Wikipedia; Amazon River rainforest, Peru, South America, Waxtail41017L1.tiff
© Ann & Rob Simpson
wax-tail planthopper, wax-tail
Fulgorid, Pterodictya...

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Chinese mantis, Tenodera sinensis, Blue Ridge Parkway, Virginia,  VA, MantisC10906x700.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinese mantis, Tenodera
sinensis, Blue...


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zombie fungus, Ophiocordyceps unilateralis is an entomopathogen, or insect-pathogenising fungus; infects ants of the Camponotini tribe, with the full pathogenesis being characterized by alteration of the behavioral patterns of the infected ant. Infected hosts leave their canopy nests and foraging trails for the forest floor, an area with a temperature and humidity suitable for fungal growth; they then use their mandibles to affix themselves to a major vein on the underside of a leaf, where the host remains until its eventual death.The process leading to mortality takes 4-10 days, and includes a reproductive stage where fruiting bodies grow from the ant's head, rupturing to release the fungus's spores. O. unilateralis is in turn also susceptible to fungal infection itself, an occurrence which can limit its impact on ant populations, which has otherwise been known to devastate ant colonies. Amazon River, Rio Napo, Amazonia, Ecuador, South America; FungusZ42939czxs.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
zombie fungus, Ophiocordyceps
unilateralis is...

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West Coast Lady, Vanessa annabellaNorth America; United States of America {America, U.S., United States, US, USA}; Wyoming, WY, Yellowstone National Park {Yellowstone Park}, Fishing Bridge, animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; invertebrates; Insect; butterfly;
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
West Coast Lady, Vanessa
annabellaNorth...

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European hornet, Vespa crabro, a large species that is often mistaken for the Asian Giant Hornet; Mutual grooming;  They will nest in trees with a large number of individuals. I accidentally stepped on one of these with my bare foot and they do pack a powerful sting.  insect, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA; HornetE13452zsx.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
European hornet, Vespa crabro,
a...

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Marbled Orb Weaver has Halloween colors. Shenandoah National Park, Virginia
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Marbled Orb Weaver has
Halloween...


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insect
© Ann Rob Simpson
insect...

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Thicket Hairstreak, Callophrys spinetorum nectaring on  Mountain Dandelion, Agoseris glauca, WY Wyoming, Grand Teton National Park, North America; United States of America {America, U.S., United States, US, USA}; Wyoming; WY; Grand Teton National Park, Grand Tetons, Jackson Lake, Coulter Bay, animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; invertebrates; Insect; butterfly, Lepidoptera; hairstreak {pseudo antenna eyespot, deflective mimickry};  {Callophrys = Mitoura} {Mitoura, larva foodplant conifer dwarf mistletoes}
© Ann and Rob
Simpson /
www.snphotos.com
Thicket Hairstreak, Callophrys
spinetorum nectaring...

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Eastern Screech Owls nest in natural cavities or will also accept a nest box.
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Eastern Screech Owls nest
in...

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Monarch, Danaus plexippus, tagging to track their movements in migration; milkweed butterfly,  most readily recognized butterfly, innate navigation ability, migrate south for winter, long distance migrator; Insect; butterfly; Brushfoots, Brush-footed butterfly, four-footed butterfly, Nymphalidae; Cape May, New Jersey, NJ, Monarch45592czxsf.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Monarch, Danaus plexippus,
tagging to...


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Curve-winged Metalmark, Emesis emesia, Big Currvy Wing, National Butterfly Center, Located in Mission, Texas, near the Rio Grande River, and only 15 minutes from a major airport in McAllen A flagship project of the North American Butterfly Association, more than 300 species of butterflies may be found in the LRGV, and more than 200 species have been seen at the National Butterfly Center, including a number of rarities and U.S. Records! MetalmarkCw0542cxzsx.tif   3333 Butterfly Park Drive, Mission, TX 78572,  956-583-5400Texas,
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Curve-winged Metalmark, Emesis
emesia, Big...

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Curve-winged Metalmark, Emesis emesia, Big Currvy Wing, National Butterfly Center, Located in Mission, Texas, near the Rio Grande River, and only 15 minutes from a major airport in McAllen A flagship project of the North American Butterfly Association, more than 300 species of butterflies may be found in the LRGV, and more than 200 species have been seen at the National Butterfly Center, including a number of rarities and U.S. Records! MetalmarkCw0542cxzs.tif   3333 Butterfly Park Drive, Mission, TX 78572,  956-583-5400Texas,
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Curve-winged Metalmark, Emesis
emesia, Big...

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Pipevine Swallowtail,  Battus philenor, and Eastern Tiger swallowtail, Papilio glaucus, Butterfly, nectaring on Turk's-cap Lily, Lilium superbum; Turk's cap Lily, Turkscap Lily, Turkscaplily, Swamp Lily, wildflower, wet meadows and woods, gentle giant of summer, native perennial; Craggy Gardens,  road to picnic area, picnic grounds, Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina; Swallowtail1533.CR2
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Pipevine Swallowtail, Battus
philenor, and...

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Turk's-cap Lily, Lilium superbum {Turk's cap Lily, Turkscap Lily, Turkscaplily, Swamp Lily, Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly, Battus philenor, wildflower, wet meadows and woods, gentle giant of summer, native perennial} Craggy Gardens, Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina; LilyTC62766czs85.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Turk's-cap Lily, Lilium
superbum {Turk's...


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Baby Oak Treehoppers being guarded by parent
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Baby Oak Treehoppers being
guarded...

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Adult and immature aphids
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Adult and immature aphids...

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Great Spangled Fritillary, Speyeria cybele, on Purple Coneflower, Echineacea purpurea,it is apparently persisting from an old homesite garden or naturalized in the park, Jewell Hollow Overlook,  Shenandoah National Park, North America; United States of America, America, U.S., United States, US, USA; Virginia; VA, Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains,
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Great Spangled Fritillary,
Speyeria cybele,...

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Great Spangled Fritillary, Speyeria cybele, on Purple Coneflower, Echineacea purpurea,it is apparently persisting from an old homesite garden or naturalized in the park, Jewell Hollow Overlook,  Shenandoah National Park, North America; United States of America, America, U.S., United States, US, USA; Virginia; VA, Appalachian Mountains, Blue Ridge Mountains,
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Great Spangled Fritillary,
Speyeria cybele,...


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Morpho, Morpho peleides limpida, Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica, Central America;  officially the Republic of Costa Rica is a country in Central America, animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; invertebrates; Insect; butterfly, Lepidoptera, 21850-00073
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Morpho, Morpho peleides
limpida, Monteverde...

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Morpho, Morpho peleides limpida, Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica, Central America;  officially the Republic of Costa Rica is a country in Central America, animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; invertebrates; Insect; butterfly, Lepidoptera, 21850-00074
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Morpho, Morpho peleides
limpida, Monteverde...

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Morpho, Morpho peleides limpida, Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica, Central America;  officially the Republic of Costa Rica is a country in Central America, animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; invertebrates; Insect; butterfly, Lepidoptera, 21850-00093
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Morpho, Morpho peleides
limpida, Monteverde...

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Morpho, Morpho peleides limpida, Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica, Central America;  officially the Republic of Costa Rica is a country in Central America, animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; invertebrates; Insect; butterfly, Lepidoptera,  21850-00034
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Morpho, Morpho peleides
limpida, Monteverde...


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Morpho, Morpho peleides limpida, Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica, Central America;  officially the Republic of Costa Rica is a country in Central America, animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; invertebrates; Insect; butterfly, Lepidoptera, pupa hatched, 218510-00085
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Morpho, Morpho peleides
limpida, Monteverde...

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Morpho, Morpho peleides limpida, Monteverde Cloud Forest, Costa Rica, Central America;  officially the Republic of Costa Rica is a country in Central America, animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; invertebrates; Insect; butterfly, Lepidoptera, morpho larva, on host plant, Mucuna sp., 21850-00032
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
Morpho, Morpho peleides
limpida, Monteverde...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41094r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Purple corn is found mostly in Peru, has been cultivated for thousands of years.  cultivated from the coast to almost ten thousand feet high.  It has been extensively used as a staple food and a natural coloring purple dye.There are different genetic strains of purple corn, all of which originated from the line called "Kculli", which is still cultivated in Peru.  Objects in the shape of these particular ears of corn have been found in archeological sites at least 2,500 years old.   Maiz morado, a purple corn native to Peru, special for its delicate lemon-blossomy flavor. Purple corn (maiz morado) is a major Andean crop.  Andeans make a refreshing drink from purple corn called "chicha morada".  It is also one of nature's richest sources of at least six different anthocyanin antioxidants. Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41075r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Purple corn is found mostly...


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Qaqa Sunka, beard lichen, Usnea barbata, Dark blues dye, red, pink, orange, purpleChinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41098r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Qaqa Sunka, beard lichen,
Usnea...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41033r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40946r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40940r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...


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Tangle-web spiders (Theridiidae), also known as cobweb spiders and comb-footed spiders snags a juicy meal in his web.
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Tangle-web spiders
(Theridiidae), also known...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40896r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40862r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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This Red-breasted Sapsucker, Syphrapicus ruber, has captured a Beetle of Beetle Rock, Trachykele opulenta. The beetle was first discovered in Sequoia at Beetle Rock and it is found on Incense cedar and Giant Sequoia trees. Crescent Meadow area, Sequoia National Park, Kings Canyon-Sequoia National Park complex, California, CA, North America; United States of America {America, U.S., United States, US, USA}; animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; birds {avain, aves, bird}; woodpecker, Family Picidae;  invertebrates; Insect; beetle, Coleoptera; Beetle of Beetle Rock, Trachykele opulenta {Bupestridae, type locality, Beetle Rock}
© Ann & Rob Simpson
/ www.snphotos.com
This Red-breasted Sapsucker,
Syphrapicus ruber,...


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woodland skipper, Ochlodes sylvanoides, WY Wyoming, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming; WY; Grand Tetons, plant, butterfly, animals; wildlife {undomesticated animals}; invertebrates; Insect; butterfly; skipper;  nectaring on {nectar} {nectaring}  {Asteraceae}; Thickstem Aster, Aster integrifolius {late summer, autumn, fall}
© Ann and Rob
Simpson /
www.snphotos.com
woodland skipper, Ochlodes
sylvanoides, WY...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40879r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40887r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, rolling the ball of yarn back and forth in a special type of weaving;  unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40903r.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, rolling the
ball...


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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru40931r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41007r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chilca, Baccharis latifolia , green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Family: Asteraceae; Chilean romerillo; Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41109r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chilca, Baccharis latifolia ,
green...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41121r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...


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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41123r.TIF
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinchero weavers,with tourist, bartering, toruism now a major income source, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41164.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers,with
tourist, bartering, toruism...

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Chinchero weavers, unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa, Luraypu, doble cara, Chinchero lliklla, traditional blankets, indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu, Natural Dyes used by Chinchinero weavers: Chilca , Baccharis latifolia Family: Asteraceae, green dye. Chillca in Quechua, Chilca, chilca black, white chilca; ch'illka in Quechua; Chilean romerillo; flowers from a bush called Qolle to make a golden yellow; copper sulfate from above Accha Alta to add to the flowers to make green; shapy, a vine from the jungle just over the mountain beyond Accha Alta, for pink; cochineal, the insect which feeds on cactus, for purple; and citric acid and alum to bump the cochineal dye solution to red. Kiko (flowers), Bidens andicola, Yellows; Qaqa Sunka, "beard lichen", Usnea barbata a lichen with Usnic acid; Dark blues; Indigo, Indigo suffruticosa; Purple Corn, purple dye; Chinchero, Andes Mountains; Chinchero or Chincheros, Chinchero or Chincheros has Inca ruins and a well-conserved medieval Spanish look. The town is one of the most beautiful ones in the Cuzco area. Chinchero is not in the Sacred Valley, but is close to it. The height from sea level of this town is 3762 m in the Andes Mountains so it is even higher than Cusco. There are Inca walls and old colonial Roman-Catholic churches. Some house walls are partly of Inca origin. The Inca influence makes Chincheros streets resemble Cuzco. Lots of traditional culture including the famous Chinchero weavers. Chinchero was the 'birthplace of the rainbow.' Located 45 minutes outside of Cusco on the high plain Pampa de Anta, Chinchero looks out on stunning views where rainbows frequently arch across potato fields during the rainy season. The colours of the rainbow can also be found throughout Chinchero textiles. The 40 adult weavers and 40 children of the community weaving association are masters in the textile art. Chinchero weavers traditionally weave in the doble cara, or two sided warp-faced, technique. Beginning in the 20th century weavers began to learn ley, or single-sided supplementary warp technique, as well as new designs from other communities. Today Chinchero weavers only create traditional textiles in the traditional techniques and designs of Chinchero, while they will utilize a variety of designs and techniques for other types of textiles. Chinchero lliklla, or traditional blankets, have a wide section of blue, red and/or green plain weave and symmetrical sections of designs. When natural indigo dye disappeared in the 20th century, many weavers chose to weave the traditionally blue plain weave section in black. For this reason, many Chinchero blankets from the early to mid 20th century have black plain weave rather than blue. Today the weavers of Chinchero have recovered natural dying and once more weave their plain-weave section in indigo blue, cochineal red, and ch'ilka green. Luraypu is the main design of the community and figures in the center of design strips with smaller designs to either side. Chinchero weavers are particularly proud of their unique boarder technique called ñawi awapa which is simultaneous woven and sewn onto the edges of textiles. In this technique the weft of the border weaving is also the thread used to sew the border onto the textile. (from weavers website); Peru, South America, Peru41190rzvc1.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinchero weavers, unique
boarder technique...

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Chinese mantis, Tenodera sinensis, Blue Ridge Parkway, Virginia,  VA, MantisC10891zs2NIKs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Chinese mantis, Tenodera
sinensis, Blue...


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Turk's-cap Lily, Lilium superbum {Turk's cap Lily, Turkscap Lily, Turkscaplily, Swamp Lily, Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly, Battus philenor, wildflower, wet meadows and woods, gentle giant of summer, native perennial} Craggy Gardens, Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina; LilyT62757zs1ocnd.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Turk's-cap Lily, Lilium
superbum {Turk's...

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Turk's-cap Lily, Lilium superbum {Turk's cap Lily, Turkscap Lily, Turkscaplily, Swamp Lily, Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly, Battus philenor, wildflower, wet meadows and woods, gentle giant of summer, native perennial} Craggy Gardens, Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina; BlueRidge6B62757zs1oc.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Turk's-cap Lily, Lilium
superbum {Turk's...


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