Ann & Rob Simpson
http://www.agpix.com/snphotos

» Search this photographer's images by keyword:



Add to lightboxDownload comp
Patagonian Scarlet Gorse, Anarthrophyllum desideratum, also known as Guanaco Bush or Fire Tongue, Called Mata Guanaco,(Guanaco Bush, Lengua de Fuego, Fire Tongue or Neneo Macho in Chile; Torres del Paine National Park Spanish: Parque Nacional Torres del Paine is a national park encompassing mountains, glaciers, lakes, and rivers in southern Chilean Patagonia. The Cordillera del Paine is the centerpiece of the park. It lies in a transition area between the Magellanic subpolar forests and the Patagonian Steppes. Torres del Paine National Park is part of the Sistema Nacional de Áreas Silvestres Protegidas del Estado de Chile (National System of Protected Forested Areas of Chile). In 2006, it measured approximately 242,242 hectares. It is one of the largest and most visited parks in Chile. The Torres del Paine are the distinctive three granite peaks of the Paine mountain range or Paine Massif. They extend 2,850 meters above sea level, and are joined by the Cuernos del Paine. The area also boasts valleys, rivers such as the Paine, lakes, and glaciers. The well-known lakes include Grey, Pehoé, Nordenskiöld, and Sarmiento. The glaciers, including Grey, Pingo and Tyndall, belong to the Southern Patagonia Ice Field. The park averages around 150,000 visitors a year, of which 60% are foreign tourists, Chile, Patagonia, South America, Patagonia9302rzs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Patagonian Scarlet Gorse,
Anarthrophyllum
desideratum,...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
Ice flows and ice bergs are spectacular blue azure, Almairantazgo Bay, Chile, Patagonia, South America, Patagonia8199rltds.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Ice flows and ice bergs...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
Patagonia, Brookes Fjord, glacial ice from bottom of glacier Brookes Glacier, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Darwin Range Ice Field, Admiralty Sound, Chile, South America; Patagonia3393Lns2.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Patagonia, Brookes Fjord,
glacial ice...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
kelp gull, Larus dominicanus, also known as the Dominican gull, is a gull which breeds on coasts and islands through much of the southern hemisphere. The nominate L. d. dominicanus is the subspecies found around South America, parts of Australia (where it overlaps with the Pacific gull), and New Zealand (where it is known as the southern black-backed gull or by its Maori name karoro). L. d. vetula (known as the Cape gull) is a subspecies occurring around southern Africa. Magdalena Island, Chile, Patagonia, South America, GullK1101rz1s.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
kelp gull, Larus dominicanus,
also...


Add to lightboxDownload comp
Magellanic woodpecker, Campephilus magellanicus, is a very large woodpecker found along the Andes of Chile and southwestern Argentina; it is resident within its range. They are the largest South American woodpeckers and one of the largest woodpeckers in the world. Magellanic woodpeckers inhabit mature Nothofagus and Nothofagus-Austrocedrus forests, where they feed mainly on wood-boring grubs and adult beetles (Coleoptera and Lepidoptera) as well as spiders. Occasionally, other foods may supplement the diet, including sap and fruits as well as small reptiles, bats and the eggs and nestlings of passerines. Almairantazgo Bay, Chile, Patagonia, South America, @fie@
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Magellanic woodpecker,
Campephilus magellanicus,
is...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
Magellanic woodpecker, Campephilus magellanicus, is a very large woodpecker found along the Andes of Chile and southwestern Argentina; it is resident within its range. They are the largest South American woodpeckers and one of the largest woodpeckers in the world. Magellanic woodpeckers inhabit mature Nothofagus and Nothofagus-Austrocedrus forests, where they feed mainly on wood-boring grubs and adult beetles (Coleoptera and Lepidoptera) as well as spiders. Occasionally, other foods may supplement the diet, including sap and fruits as well as small reptiles, bats and the eggs and nestlings of passerines. Almairantazgo Bay, Chile, Patagonia, South America, @fie@
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Magellanic woodpecker,
Campephilus magellanicus,
is...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
leopard seal, Hydrurga leptonyx, also referred to as the sea leopard, is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic after the southern elephant seal. Along with all of the other earless seals, it belongs to the family Phocidae, and is the only species in the genus Hydrurga. The name hydrurga means "water worker" and leptonyx is the Greek for "small clawed". The leopard seal lives in the cold waters surrounding the Antarctic continent. Where most seals remain restricted within the pack ice throughout the year, some (mostly young animals) move further north in the austral winter to subantarctic islands and the coastlines of the southern continents. They spend long periods of time vocalizing under the water during the austral spring and summer. The leopard seal is classified within the family Phocidae. Its closest relatives are the Ross seal, crabeater seal and the Weddell seal, which together are known as the lobodontine seals. All these seals descend from the superfamily Pinnipeda, which evolved from bear-like ancestors. They have diverged from other taxa in the order Carnivora. The leopard seal share homologous features with its close relatives, the lobodontine seals. They all have dark fur on the tops of their bodies and lighter fur on their underbellies. Though the colors vary between these species, the colored fur serves the same function of camouflaging the individual to conceal it from both predator and prey. The leopard seal is second only to the killer whale among Antarctica's top predators. Its canine teeth are 2.5 cm (1 in). It feeds on a wide variety of creatures. Smaller seals probably eat mostly krill, but also squid and fish. Larger leopard seals probably switch from krill to more substantial prey, including king, adelie, rockhopper, gentoo, emperor, and chinstrap penguins, and less frequently, other seals, such as crabeater seal. Leopard seals have been filmed eating fur seal pups. Parry Fjord to an ice field where multiple glaciers have formed a natural amphitheater. Leopard Seals - typically found in Antarctica, Chile, Patagonia, South America, SealL8467rnxs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
leopard seal, Hydrurga
leptonyx, also...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
leopard seal, Hydrurga leptonyx, also referred to as the sea leopard, is the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic after the southern elephant seal. Along with all of the other earless seals, it belongs to the family Phocidae, and is the only species in the genus Hydrurga. The name hydrurga means "water worker" and leptonyx is the Greek for "small clawed". The leopard seal lives in the cold waters surrounding the Antarctic continent. Where most seals remain restricted within the pack ice throughout the year, some (mostly young animals) move further north in the austral winter to subantarctic islands and the coastlines of the southern continents. They spend long periods of time vocalizing under the water during the austral spring and summer. The leopard seal is classified within the family Phocidae. Its closest relatives are the Ross seal, crabeater seal and the Weddell seal, which together are known as the lobodontine seals. All these seals descend from the superfamily Pinnipeda, which evolved from bear-like ancestors. They have diverged from other taxa in the order Carnivora. The leopard seal share homologous features with its close relatives, the lobodontine seals. They all have dark fur on the tops of their bodies and lighter fur on their underbellies. Though the colors vary between these species, the colored fur serves the same function of camouflaging the individual to conceal it from both predator and prey. The leopard seal is second only to the killer whale among Antarctica's top predators. Its canine teeth are 2.5 cm (1 in). It feeds on a wide variety of creatures. Smaller seals probably eat mostly krill, but also squid and fish. Larger leopard seals probably switch from krill to more substantial prey, including king, adelie, rockhopper, gentoo, emperor, and chinstrap penguins, and less frequently, other seals, such as crabeater seal. Leopard seals have been filmed eating fur seal pups. Parry Fjord to an ice field where multiple glaciers have formed a natural amphitheater. Leopard Seals - typically found in Antarctica, Chile, Patagonia, South America, SealL1047rs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
leopard seal, Hydrurga
leptonyx, also...


Add to lightboxDownload comp
South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, mating, formerly Otaria byronia, southern sea lion, Patagonian sea lion; South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, formerly Otaria byronia, also called the southern sea lion and the Patagonian sea lion, is a sea lion found on the Chilean, Ecuador, Peruvian, Uruguayan, Argentine and Southern Brazilian coasts. It is the only member of the genus Otaria. Its scientific name was subject to controversy, with some taxonomists referring to it as Otaria flavescens and others referring to it as Otaria byronia. The former eventually won out, although that may still be overturned. Locally, it is known by several names, most commonly lobo marino (sea wolf) and león marino (sea lion).The South American sea lion is perhaps the archetypal sea lion in appearance. Males have a very large head with a well-developed mane, making them the most lionesque of the eared seals. They are twice the weight of females. Both males and females are orange or brown coloured with upturned snouts. Pups are born greyish orange ventrally and black dorsally and moult into a more chocolate colour.The South American sea lion's size and weight can vary considerably. Adult males can grow over 2.73 m (9 ft) and weigh up to 350 kg (770 lb). Adult females grow up to 1.8-2 m (6-7 ft) and weigh about half the weight of the males, around 150 kg (330 lb). This species is even more sexually dimorphic than the other sea lions. Its front teeth are sharp like those of other carnivores, but its molars lock together in a way that allows them to sieve krill from the water, in the manner of the crab eater seal.Chile, Valpariso, South America, Sealion5039rzs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
South American sea lion,
Otaria...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
Magellanic penguin, Spheniscus magellanicus on Magdalena Island, is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil where they are occasionally seen as far north as Rio de Janeiro. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African, the Humboldt and the Galápagos penguins. The Magellanic penguin was named after Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, who spotted the birds in 1520.  enormous penguin colony. Chile, Patagonia, South America, PenguinM9964rs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Magellanic penguin, Spheniscus
magellanicus on...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
Magellanic penguin, Spheniscus magellanicus on Magdalena Island, is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil where they are occasionally seen as far north as Rio de Janeiro. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African, the Humboldt and the Galápagos penguins. The Magellanic penguin was named after Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, who spotted the birds in 1520.  enormous penguin colony. Chile, Patagonia, South America, PenguinM0744rs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Magellanic penguin, Spheniscus
magellanicus on...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
Torres del Paine National Park, glacial water, glacial stream, glacial rivers are blue azure;  (Spanish: Parque Nacional Torres del Paine) is a national park encompassing mountains, glaciers, lakes, and rivers in southern Chilean Patagonia. The Cordillera del Paine is the centerpiece of the park. It lies in a transition area between the Magellanic subpolar forests and the Patagonian Steppes. Torres del Paine National Park is part of the Sistema Nacional de Áreas Silvestres Protegidas del Estado de Chile (National System of Protected Forested Areas of Chile). In 2006, it measured approximately 242,242 hectares. It is one of the largest and most visited parks in Chile. The Torres del Paine are the distinctive three granite peaks of the Paine mountain range or Paine Massif. They extend 2,850 meters above sea level, and are joined by the Cuernos del Paine. The area also boasts valleys, rivers such as the Paine, lakes, and glaciers. The well-known lakes include Grey, Pehoé, Nordenskiöld, and Sarmiento. The glaciers, including Grey, Pingo and Tyndall, belong to the Southern Patagonia Ice Field. The park averages around 150,000 visitors a year, of which 60% are foreign tourists, Chile, Patagonia, South America, Patagonia9191rs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Torres del Paine National
Park,...


Add to lightboxDownload comp
Patagonia, Brookes Fjord, glacial calving Brookes Glacier, Alberto de Agostini National Park, Darwin Range Ice Field, Admiralty Sound, Chile, South America; Patagonia1284rzs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Patagonia, Brookes Fjord,
glacial calving...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
Torres del Paine National Park, sunrise, daybreak, dawn, sun up; (Spanish: Parque Nacional Torres del Paine) is a national park encompassing mountains, glaciers, lakes, and rivers in southern Chilean Patagonia. The Cordillera del Paine is the centerpiece of the park. It lies in a transition area between the Magellanic subpolar forests and the Patagonian Steppes. Torres del Paine National Park is part of the Sistema Nacional de Áreas Silvestres Protegidas del Estado de Chile (National System of Protected Forested Areas of Chile). In 2006, it measured approximately 242,242 hectares. It is one of the largest and most visited parks in Chile. The Torres del Paine are the distinctive three granite peaks of the Paine mountain range or Paine Massif. They extend 2,850 meters above sea level, and are joined by the Cuernos del Paine. The area also boasts valleys, rivers such as the Paine, lakes, and glaciers. The well-known lakes include Grey, Pehoé, Nordenskiöld, and Sarmiento. The glaciers, including Grey, Pingo and Tyndall, belong to the Southern Patagonia Ice Field. The park averages around 150,000 visitors a year, of which 60% are foreign tourists, Chile, Patagonia, South America, @fie@
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Torres del Paine National
Park,...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
Andean condor, Vultur gryphus, Torres del Paine National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Torres del Paine) is a national park encompassing mountains, glaciers, lakes, and rivers in southern Chilean Patagonia. The Cordillera del Paine is the centerpiece of the park. It lies in a transition area between the Magellanic subpolar forests and the Patagonian Steppes. Torres del Paine National Park is part of the Sistema Nacional de Áreas Silvestres Protegidas del Estado de Chile (National System of Protected Forested Areas of Chile). In 2006, it measured approximately 242,242 hectares. It is one of the largest and most visited parks in Chile. The Torres del Paine are the distinctive three granite peaks of the Paine mountain range or Paine Massif. They extend 2,850 meters above sea level, and are joined by the Cuernos del Paine. The area also boasts valleys, rivers such as the Paine, lakes, and glaciers. The well-known lakes include Grey, Pehoé, Nordenskiöld, and Sarmiento. The glaciers, including Grey, Pingo and Tyndall, belong to the Southern Patagonia Ice Field. The park averages around 150,000 visitors a year, of which 60% are foreign tourists, Chile, Patagonia, South America, CondorA1643rxs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Andean condor, Vultur gryphus,
Torres...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
guanaco, Lama guanicoe, is a camelid native to South America that stands between 1 and 1.2 metres (3 ft 3 in and 3 ft 11 in) at the shoulder[2] and weighs about 90 kg (200 lb). The colour varies very little (unlike the domestic llama), ranging from a light brown to dark cinnamon and shading to white underneath. Guanacos have grey faces and small straight ears. To protect its neck from harm, the guanaco has developed thicker skin on its neck. The name guanaco comes from the South American language Quechua word wanaku (old spelling, huanaco).[3] Young guanacos are called chulengo(s). Guanacos are often found at high altitudes, up to 13,000 feet above sea level, except in Patagonia, where the southerly latitude means ice covers the vegetation at these altitudes. To survive the low oxygen levels found at these high altitudes the blood is rich in red blood cells. A teaspoon of guanaco blood contains about 68 billion red blood cells, ~four times that of a human.Torres del Paine National Park (Spanish: Parque Nacional Torres del Paine) is a national park encompassing mountains, glaciers, lakes, and rivers in southern Chilean Patagonia. The Cordillera del Paine is the centerpiece of the park. It lies in a transition area between the Magellanic subpolar forests and the Patagonian Steppes. Torres del Paine National Park is part of the Sistema Nacional de Áreas Silvestres Protegidas del Estado de Chile (National System of Protected Forested Areas of Chile). In 2006, it measured approximately 242,242 hectares. It is one of the largest and most visited parks in Chile. The Torres del Paine are the distinctive three granite peaks of the Paine mountain range or Paine Massif. They extend 2,850 meters above sea level, and are joined by the Cuernos del Paine. .  Chile, Patagonia, South America, Guacano3343rzs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
guanaco, Lama guanicoe, is
a...


Add to lightboxDownload comp
Torres del Paine National Park, sunrise, daybreak, dawn, sun up; (Spanish: Parque Nacional Torres del Paine) is a national park encompassing mountains, glaciers, lakes, and rivers in southern Chilean Patagonia. The Cordillera del Paine is the centerpiece of the park. It lies in a transition area between the Magellanic subpolar forests and the Patagonian Steppes. Torres del Paine National Park is part of the Sistema Nacional de Áreas Silvestres Protegidas del Estado de Chile (National System of Protected Forested Areas of Chile). In 2006, it measured approximately 242,242 hectares. It is one of the largest and most visited parks in Chile. The Torres del Paine are the distinctive three granite peaks of the Paine mountain range or Paine Massif. They extend 2,850 meters above sea level, and are joined by the Cuernos del Paine. The area also boasts valleys, rivers such as the Paine, lakes, and glaciers. The well-known lakes include Grey, Pehoé, Nordenskiöld, and Sarmiento. The glaciers, including Grey, Pingo and Tyndall, belong to the Southern Patagonia Ice Field. The park averages around 150,000 visitors a year, of which 60% are foreign tourists, Chile, Patagonia, South America, @fie@
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Torres del Paine National
Park,...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, mating, formerly Otaria byronia, southern sea lion, Patagonian sea lion; South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, formerly Otaria byronia, also called the southern sea lion and the Patagonian sea lion, is a sea lion found on the Chilean, Ecuador, Peruvian, Uruguayan, Argentine and Southern Brazilian coasts. It is the only member of the genus Otaria. Its scientific name was subject to controversy, with some taxonomists referring to it as Otaria flavescens and others referring to it as Otaria byronia. The former eventually won out, although that may still be overturned. Locally, it is known by several names, most commonly lobo marino (sea wolf) and león marino (sea lion).The South American sea lion is perhaps the archetypal sea lion in appearance. Males have a very large head with a well-developed mane, making them the most lionesque of the eared seals. They are twice the weight of females. Both males and females are orange or brown coloured with upturned snouts. Pups are born greyish orange ventrally and black dorsally and moult into a more chocolate colour.The South American sea lion's size and weight can vary considerably. Adult males can grow over 2.73 m (9 ft) and weigh up to 350 kg (770 lb). Adult females grow up to 1.8-2 m (6-7 ft) and weigh about half the weight of the males, around 150 kg (330 lb). This species is even more sexually dimorphic than the other sea lions. Its front teeth are sharp like those of other carnivores, but its molars lock together in a way that allows them to sieve krill from the water, in the manner of the crab eater seal.Chile, Valpariso, South America, SealionSA4847zsm.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
South American sea lion,
Otaria...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, mating, formerly Otaria byronia, southern sea lion, Patagonian sea lion; South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, formerly Otaria byronia, also called the southern sea lion and the Patagonian sea lion, is a sea lion found on the Chilean, Ecuador, Peruvian, Uruguayan, Argentine and Southern Brazilian coasts. It is the only member of the genus Otaria. Its scientific name was subject to controversy, with some taxonomists referring to it as Otaria flavescens and others referring to it as Otaria byronia. The former eventually won out, although that may still be overturned. Locally, it is known by several names, most commonly lobo marino (sea wolf) and león marino (sea lion).The South American sea lion is perhaps the archetypal sea lion in appearance. Males have a very large head with a well-developed mane, making them the most lionesque of the eared seals. They are twice the weight of females. Both males and females are orange or brown coloured with upturned snouts. Pups are born greyish orange ventrally and black dorsally and moult into a more chocolate colour.The South American sea lion's size and weight can vary considerably. Adult males can grow over 2.73 m (9 ft) and weigh up to 350 kg (770 lb). Adult females grow up to 1.8-2 m (6-7 ft) and weigh about half the weight of the males, around 150 kg (330 lb). This species is even more sexually dimorphic than the other sea lions. Its front teeth are sharp like those of other carnivores, but its molars lock together in a way that allows them to sieve krill from the water, in the manner of the crab eater seal.Chile, Valpariso, South America, SealionSA4930czs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
South American sea lion,
Otaria...

Add to lightboxDownload comp
Magellanic woodpecker, Campephilus magellanicus, is a very large woodpecker found along the Andes of Chile and southwestern Argentina; it is resident within its range. They are the largest South American woodpeckers and one of the largest woodpeckers in the world. Magellanic woodpeckers inhabit mature Nothofagus and Nothofagus-Austrocedrus forests, where they feed mainly on wood-boring grubs and adult beetles (Coleoptera and Lepidoptera) as well as spiders. Occasionally, other foods may supplement the diet, including sap and fruits as well as small reptiles, bats and the eggs and nestlings of passerines. Almairantazgo Bay, Chile, Patagonia, South America, WoodpeckerM0282Lnxgcs.jpg
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Magellanic woodpecker,
Campephilus magellanicus,
is...


Add to lightboxDownload comp
Magellanic penguin, Spheniscus magellanicus on Magdalena Island, is a South American penguin, breeding in coastal Argentina, Chile and the Falkland Islands, with some migrating to Brazil where they are occasionally seen as far north as Rio de Janeiro. It is the most numerous of the Spheniscus penguins. Its nearest relatives are the African, the Humboldt and the Galápagos penguins. The Magellanic penguin was named after Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, who spotted the birds in 1520.  enormous penguin colony. Chile, Patagonia, South America, PenguinM0744rs.tif
© Ann & Rob Simpson
Magellanic penguin, Spheniscus
magellanicus on...


Page 1 of 1  [ Matches 1 - 21 of 21 ]

1