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Eliot Cohen & Judith Jango-Cohen »
Great Falls of the Snake River, Latter Day Saints Temple, Idaho Falls, Idaho

Johann Schumacher Design »
Common yellowthroat in early September fall migration, birds, fall warblers, songbirds,

Johann Schumacher Design »
Peregrine falcon in late September

Eliot Cohen & Judith Jango-Cohen »
Mineralized Petrified Wood, Petrified Forest National Park, Holbrook, Arizona


Ann & Rob Simpson »
Machu Picchu, Machu Picchu is a 15th-century Inca citadel situated on a mountain ridge 2,430 metres above sea level. It is located in the Cusco Region, Urubamba Province, Machupicchu District in Peru, above the Sacred Valley, which is 80 kilometres northwest of Cuzco and through which the Urubamba River flows. Most archaeologists believe that Machu Picchu was constructed as an estate for the Inca emperor Pachacuti (1438-1472). Often mistakenly referred to as the "Lost City of the Incas" (a title more accurately applied to Vilcabamba), it is the most familiar icon of Inca civilization. The Incas built the estate around 1450 but abandoned it a century later at the time of the Spanish Conquest. Although known locally, it was not known to the Spanish during the colonial period and remained unknown to the outside world until American historian Hiram Bingham brought it to international attention in 1911. Machu Picchu was built in the classical Inca style, with polished dry-stone walls. Its three primary structures are the Intihuatana, the Temple of the Sun, and the Room of the Three Windows. Most of the outlying buildings have been reconstructed in order to give tourists a better idea of how they originally appeared.[5] By 1976, thirty percent of Machu Picchu had been restored[6] and restoration continues.[7] Machu Picchu was declared a Peruvian Historic Sanctuary in 1981 and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983.[3] In 2007, Machu Picchu was voted one of the New Seven Wonders of the World in a worldwide Internet poll.[8] Wikipedia. Peru, South America; MachuPicchu14042s1.tif

Eileen Herrling »
Sunflowers and Stop Sign, Cecil, Wisconsin

Lee Rentz »
Nerve Plant, Fittonia sp., from South America, growing in the Palm House in the Anna Scripps Whitcomb Conservatory in Belle Isle Park, Detroit, Michigan, USA

Johann Schumacher Design »
Mallard drake stretching on late autumn pond


Lee Rentz »
Lodgepole Pine, Pinus contorta, forest at night with stars shining above, in Newberry National Volcanic Monument, central Oregon, USA

Dennis Cox, LLC »
Panama hats sold on the street in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia.

Pat and Chuck Blackley »
Jordan Pond Shore Trail, Acadia National Park, Mount Desert Island, Maine, USA

Pat and Chuck Blackley »
Towpath Trail Boardwallk, Beaver Marsh, Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Brecksville, Ohio, USA


Norman Eggert »
Woman sitting on the steps of the Harvard Library reading

Lee Rentz »
Hiker on trail to Mount Townsend in the Buckhorn Wilderness, Olympic National Forest, Washington State, USA

Lee Rentz »
Trail through a subalpine wildflower meadow on the way to Mount Townsend in the Buckhorn Wilderness, Olympic National Forest, Washington State, USA

Paul Rezendes »
Autumn Reflections in Fitchburg Reservoir, Ashby, MA


Johann Schumacher Design »
Juvenile snowy owl perched in late afternoon mid-January light

Steve Warble - Mountain Magic Photography »
Storm Clouds over the Llano Estacado

Ann & Rob Simpson »
Cusco, capital of the Inca empire, Coricancha, Convent of Santo Domingo, and courtyard, Intipampa. Qorikancha was the religious center of Cusco, geographical and political center. The Temple of Qorichancha, was where maximum paid homage to the Inca god "Inti" (Sun) was held. "Qori" means gold worked its Spanish form is cori. "Kancha" means an enclosed space, bounded by walls. Hence it is that the name corresponds approximately "place that has gold". Originally named Intikancha or Intiwasi, it was dedicated to Inti, and is located at the old Inca capital of Cusco. Mostly destroyed after the 16th century war with the Spanish conquistadors much of its stonework forms the foundation of the Santo Domingo church and convent. Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui rebuilt Cusco and the House of the Sun, enriching it with more oracles and edifices, and adding plates of fine gold. He provided vases of gold and silver for the Mama-cunas, nuns, to use in the veneration services. Finally, he took the bodies of the seven deceased Incas, and enriched them with masks, head-dresses, medals, bracelets, sceptres of gold, placing them on a golden bench. The walls were once covered in sheets of gold, and its adjacent courtyard was filled with golden statues. Spanish reports tell of its opulence that was "fabulous beyond belief". When the Spanish required the Inca to raise a ransom in gold for the life of the leader Atahualpa, most of the gold was collected from Coricancha. The Spanish colonists built the Church of Santo Domingo on the site, demolishing the temple and using its foundations for the cathedral. Construction took most of a century. This is one of numerous sites where the Spanish incorporated Inca stonework into the structure of a colonial building. Major earthquakes severely damaged the church, but the Inca stone walls, built out of huge, tightly-interlocking blocks of stone, still stand due to their sophisticated stone masonry. Nearby is an underground archaeological museum, which contains numerous interesting pieces, including mummies, textiles, and sacred idols from the site. The site now also includes the Church and Convent of Santo Domingo. [11] Wikipedia Peru, South America, PERU33614.CR2